A new study found that taking 4,000 international units per day may double the amount of vitamin D in the blood, but it gives most people roughly the same chance of developing blood sugar problems as people who do not take the vitamin.

Vitamin D supplementation may not improve bone density or prevent fractures and falls in adults, a large new analysis suggests.

Parents and caregivers should be aware of the three ways children can get the vitamin D they need, according to a new resource published in the medical journal JAMA Pediatrics.

Older adults who take vitamin D and calcium are no less likely to break their hips or other bones than peers who do not use these supplements per a research review.

Decreasing sensitivity to insulin — often associated with obesity and eventual type 2 diabetes — may also cause young adults to have lower bone mass at a time of life when it should be at its peak, Korean researchers say.

Kids who spend more time outdoors and who play sports are less likely to be near-sighted, according to a recent study in a large, diverse group of urban 6-year-olds.

  Study in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Highlights Risk Factors, Treatment Protocols     CHICAGO, May 1, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ –Results from a clinical review published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association find nearly 1 billion people worldwide may have deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D due to chronic disease […]

PALO ALTO, Calif. – Theranos and its chief, Elizabeth Holmes, called a scathing Wall Street Journal report alleging the company only performs 10 percent of its blood tests on its proprietary technology “factually and scientifically erroneous,” according to a statement on the company website. Theranos said it provided all the necessary information to the Wall […]