Reportedly, Pfizer is holding the company’s COVID-19 antiviral therapy Paxlovid under tight control. This is a disappointment to numerous investigators who want to test the antiviral combination therapy with other drugs in case the virus develops resistance to the combo.

Half of the COVID-19 patients discharged from a Chinese hospital in early 2020 still have at least one symptom two years later, a new study shows. Additionally, new findings suggest patterns of inflammatory proteins in the blood of people with long COVID may someday help guide individualized treatment.

An experimental treatment from Shionogi & Co. Ltd. has shown rapid clearance of the virus that causes COVID-19, according to new data, the Japanese drug maker said on April 24.

Almost a third of people report at least one ongoing symptom between 6 and 12 months after their coronavirus infection, according to a survey of 152,000 people in Denmark.

Drugmaker Shionogi applied for approval to make and sell the company’s oral COVID-19 treatment in Japan, the firm said on February 25.

Speaking with French newspaper Le Figaro, Pfizer Chief Executive Officer Albert Bourla said he believes the world will “return to normal life” sometime during the spring of 2022.

After a five-day quarantine, about a third of people infected with SARS-CoV-2 might still be infectious, according to new data. In other news, according to research published in the Journal of Primary Care & Community Health, e-cigarette users infected with the coronavirus may be more likely than infected non-vapers to experience COVID-19 symptoms

The more infectious Omicron variant of Covid-19 appears to produce less severe disease than the globally dominant Delta strain, but should not be categorized as “mild”, World Health Organization (WHO) officials said on January 6.

The United States cannot be complacent about the Omicron variant of the coronavirus despite signs of its lower severity compared to the Delta variant, top U.S. infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci said on January 5.

More evidence is emerging that the Omicron coronavirus variant is affecting the upper respiratory tract, causing milder symptoms than previous variants and resulting in a “decoupling” in some places between soaring case numbers and low death rates, a World Health Organization official said on January 4.