The first big real-world study of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine to be independently reviewed shows the shot is highly effective at preventing Covid-19, in a potentially landmark moment for countries desperate to end lockdowns and reopen economies.

GlaxoSmithKline and Sanofi started a new clinical trial of their protein-based Covid-19 vaccine candidate, reviving their efforts against the pandemic after a setback in December delayed the shot’s launch.

AstraZeneca and Oxford University’s Covid-19 vaccine is more effective when its second dose is given three months after the first, instead of six weeks, a peer-reviewed study published in The Lancet medical journal showed on Feb. 19.

The World Health Organization listed AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine for emergency use, widening access in the developing world, while sources said the EU is in talks with Moderna on buying more vaccines.

The head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Feb. 14 it is “absolutely” too soon to lift mask mandates, citing daily Covid-19 case numbers that despite recent declines remain more than double the levels seen the summer of 2020.

Israel’s largest healthcare provider reported a 94% drop in symptomatic Covid-19 infections among 600,000 people who received two doses of Pfizer’s vaccine in the country’s biggest study to date.

California surpassed New York on Feb. 9 as the U.S. state with the most coronavirus deaths, a grim reminder of the pandemic’s toll even as the vaccine rollout and a sharp drop in new cases buoyed hopes of life eventually returning to normal.

Johnson & Johnson Chief Executive Officer Alex Gorsky told CNBC that people may need to get vaccinated against Covid-19 annually over the next several years, like seasonal flu shots.

Almost all people previously infected with Covid-19 have high levels of antibodies for at least six months that are likely to protect them from reinfection with the disease, results of a major UK study showed.

Oxford University and AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine showed in a study it had 76% efficacy against symptomatic infection for three months after a single dose, which increased if the second shot is delayed, backing Britain’s vaccine rollout policy.