Britain’s GSK said an injection of the company’s cabotegravir drug given every two months was found to be 65 percent more effective in preventing HIV infections than Gilead’s Truvada daily oral pills.

A cheaper HIV prevention pill is going on sale in the United States, but experts say the price drop will not help as many people if doctors instead prescribe a newer, more expensive brand-name drug.

British drugmaker GSK applied for a license to market the company’s HIV medicine dolutegravir in a formulation designed to be easier for babies and children who are living with the virus to swallow.

Danish drugmaker Novo Nordisk is aiming for a big slice of the multibillion-dollar diabetes market with a new pill approved by U.S. authorities that caters for patients with an aversion to needles.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Novo Nordisk’s Rybelsus (semaglutide) tablets 7 mg or 14 mg for adults with type 2 diabetes that along with diet and exercise may improve blood sugar.

A landmark French trial will seek to settle one of the country’s biggest pharmaceutical scandals, probing whether the company behind a weight-loss drug believed to have triggered killer side effects covered up the risks.

Novo Nordisk submitted the company’s oral semaglutide drug, a pill that management hopes will transform the diabetes market, for approval in the United States.

A research team at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) developed a capsule about the size of a blueberry that holds a tiny needle that, after being swallowed, injects insulin into the stomach.

Novo Nordisk said data from a large final-stage study of a pill the company hopes will transform the diabetes market proved better at lowering blood sugar levels than Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim’s established Jardiance.

After nearly a century building a company worth $125 billion based on injectable drugs, Denmark’s Novo Nordisk – the world’s biggest insulin maker – wants to prove during 2018 that it can transform the diabetes market with a pill.