The U.S. Justice Department sued Walmart Inc., accusing the world’s largest retailer of fueling the opioid crisis in the United States, ignoring warning signs from the company’s pharmacists and filling thousands of invalid prescriptions.

Purdue Pharma LP pleaded guilty to criminal charges over the handling of the company’s addictive prescription painkiller OxyContin, capping a deal with federal prosecutors to resolve an investigation into the drugmaker’s role in the U.S. opioid crisis.

McKesson Corp. said the company and two other major U.S. drug distributors could be expected to pay up to $21 billion under a new proposal by state attorneys general to resolve lawsuits alleging they helped fuel the U.S. opioid crisis.

Johnson & Johnson will contribute up to $1 billion more to a potential settlement of lawsuits alleging the New Brunswick, New Jersey-based drugmaker and other companies fueled the U.S. opioid epidemic, bringing J&J’s total payment to $5 billion.

Mallinckrodt filed for bankruptcy protection, saddled with lawsuits alleging the company helped fuel the U.S. opioid epidemic.

A federal appeals court overturned a judge’s approval of a novel plan by lawyers representing cities and counties suing drug companies over the U.S. opioid crisis that would bring every community nationally into their settlement talks.

Insys founder John Kapoor is using the coronavirus pandemic as part of his legal defense to remain out of prison while he appeals his January 2020 racketeering conviction for kickback schemes to boost prescriptions of his company’s powerful opioid Subsys.

Value has so many meanings, but unfortunately the term has become synonymous with cost in the media/political landscape. As agency partners, we can help redefine how our clients communicate value to all audiences: HCPs, patients, caregivers, payers, investors, media at large and even to employees.

Twenty one states rejected an $18 billion settlement proposal from three major U.S. drug distributors to resolve lawsuits over their alleged role in the opioid crisis, although settlement discussions continue, according to two sources familiar with the matter.

John Kapoor, the founder and former chief executive officer of Insys Therapeutics, was sentenced to more than five years in federal prison for the role his company played in the opioid epidemic.