A federal judge dismissed a challenge by hospital groups to a federal rule requiring them to disclose prices they quietly negotiate with insurers, in a victory for White House efforts to make healthcare pricing more transparent to patients.

A Missouri appeals court rejected Johnson & Johnson’s bid to throw out a jury verdict in favor of women who blamed their ovarian cancer on the company’s baby powder and other talc products, but reduced its damages award to $2.12 billion from $4.69 billion.

New York state filed civil charges accusing Endo International Plc of insurance fraud for misrepresenting the safety and efficacy of the company’s opioid drugs, adding fuel to the nation’s opioid crisis.

Twenty-six drug manufacturers were sued by the attorneys general of most U.S. states and several territories, which accused them of conspiring to reduce competition and drive up generic drug prices.

A Harvard professor arrested earlier this year for failing to disclose ties to China’s Thousand Talents Program was indicted for making false statements to federal authorities regarding that work in Wuhan, China.

A federal appeals court revived nationwide litigation accusing Roche Holding AG’s Genentech unit of failing to ensure that vials of the comapny’s Herceptin breast cancer drug contained the labeled amount of the active ingredient, and that the labels misstated the drug’s concentration and volume.

Johnson & Johnson will stop selling talc Baby Powder in the United States and Canada, saying demand had fallen in the wake of what the company called “misinformation” about the product’s safety amid a barrage of legal challenges.

The U.S. Supreme Court considered a bid by Donald Trump’s administration to implement rules allowing employers to obtain religious exemptions from an Obamacare requirement that health insurance that they provide to employees covers women’s birth control.

Shares of Amarin Corporation were down more than 70 percent in trading after a judge ruled that generic companies can go ahead and seek approval of generic versions of the drug manufacturer’s heart disease drug Vascepa.

A highly anticipated trial pitting New York state against McKesson Corp., Johnson & Johnson, CVS Health Corp. and others for allegedly fueling the opioid epidemic was postponed due to the coronavirus outbreak, according to the court.