Europe’s drug regulator on June 11 identified another rare blood condition as a potential side effect of AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine and said it was looking into cases of heart inflammation after inoculation with all coronavirus shots.

Preliminary findings from two vaccine safety monitoring systems suggest a higher-than-expected number of cases of heart inflammation after the second dose of mRNA Covid-19 vaccines in young men, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on June 10.

Some teenagers and young adults who received Covid-19 vaccines experienced heart inflammation, a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory group said, recommending further study of the rare condition.

Bristol Myers Squibb announced a new analysis of data from the Phase 3 EXPLORER-HCM study evaluating mavacamten, an investigational, first-in-class cardiac myosin inhibitor, in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (oHCM), which was presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 70th Annual Scientific Session with simultaneous publication in The Lancet.

In a roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for Covid-19, a new study may help identify which Covid-19 patients with signs of heart injury are at higher risk for death.

The U.S. Federal Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C. reinstated a 2017 jury verdict against Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, ordering the company to pay GlaxoSmithKline $235.5 million in a 13-year-old induced patent infringement case.

A new study published in Nature suggests that with a cellular and molecular map of the healthy human heart, experts may be able to better understand what goes wrong in cardiovascular disease.

AstraZeneca’s Farxiga improved survival chances for patients suffering from kidney disease, underscoring the medicine’s role outside the drug’s established field of diabetes.

British drugmaker AstraZeneca topped second-quarter sales and profit estimates and backed the company’s 2020 forecasts, helped by strong sales in lockdowns of a diverse product range that includes a potential coronavirus vaccine.

Pfizer Inc. filed a lawsuit seeking to require the federal government to let it help Medicare beneficiaries afford two drugs to treat a rare and sometimes fatal heart condition, and which cost $225,000 a year.