The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved AstraZeneca and Merck’s Lynparza (olaparib) in combination with Roche’s Avastin (bevacizumab) for the maintenance treatment of adults with advanced epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer who are in complete or partial response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy and whose cancer has been tested to have either a deleterious or suspected deleterious BRCA mutation and/or genomic instability.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration cleared expanded use of GlaxoSmithKline Plc’s Zejula as a first option to keep advanced ovarian cancer at bay in women who have responded to chemotherapy.

“Put the patient first.” It’s every pharma marketer’s favorite buzz-phrase in 2020. And why not? Patients are our real customers; they use and (hopefully) benefit from our products, and their wants and needs drive the success or failure of everything we do.

First-quarter 2020 earnings reports are coming out, the stock market remains volatile and much of the world is still on lockdown. In this challenging environment, there are business opportunities abound, “but investors are taking a hard look at their checkbooks,” Keith Bliss, managing partner and CEO of iQ Capital, told BioSpace.

GlaxoSmithKline and AstraZeneca both reported late-stage clinical trial results that will likely make their competing medicines available to a wider group of ovarian cancer patients, possibly helping GSK catch the company’s rival in a highly contested drug class.

GlaxoSmithKline and AstraZeneca will each present clinical trial data on a promising new class of drugs against ovarian cancer as Britain’s top drugmakers compete to burnish their oncology credentials.

AstraZeneca made further headway in a race with competitor GlaxoSmithKline to use a promising new class of drugs to treat ovarian cancer.

GlaxoSmithKline Plc’s cancer treatment Zejula met the main goal of helping patients with ovarian cancer live longer without their disease worsening in a late-stage study, the company said.

Foundation Medicine Inc. received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for FoundationOne CDx to be used as a companion diagnostic for Lynparza (olaparib) for first-line maintenance therapy in BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer.

ImmunoGen shares fell after the company announced the slashing of 220 employees as part of an effort to reduce ongoing expenses while recovering from an FDA rejection of an ovarian cancer drug.