Working in the rare disease space has never been more rewarding than it is today. Technology is turning what was once thought to be impossible into actual, tangible realities for physicians, patients, and families. There are many exciting advancements happening now – in real time – and even more on the horizon that demand our attention and advocacy to help bring them to light.

Durham, N.C.-based Precision BioSciences set the company’s initial public offering price at $16 per share, raising $126.4 million.

The online publication NEO.LIFE pointed to seven areas where biotech companies and researchers have significant potential to “dramatically reshape our concept of what it means to be human.”

Here are seven trends most likely to be hitting the news cycle in 2019 according to BioSpace.

Barring a last-minute reversal, 2018 will likely end as a down year for the biotech industry, at least in terms of stock performance.

Biopharma executives were asked to predict what the next year might reveal.

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) published research in the journal Science Advances describing yet another CRISPR improvement.

Genome engineering company Synthego received an infusion of $110 million from a Series C financing round led by Peter Thiel’s Founders Fund. The funds will be used to accelerate the company’s vision to make CRISPR technology more accessible to researchers.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration lifted a clinical hold and accepted an Investigational New Drug Application (IND) for an experimental sickle cell disease treatment being jointly developed by Vertex Pharmaceuticals and CRISPR Therapeutics.

Two antimalarial strategies have been published from Imperial College London: new compounds that prevent the malaria parasite from infecting mosquitoes and gene-edited mosquitoes that cannot reproduce, leading to population destruction.