BioSpace reviews some of the more interesting recently published scientific studies, including whether the Covid-19 virus relieve pain.

According to a study published in the journal Science Advances, an international team of researchers led by neuroscientists at Harvard Medical School uncovered which olfactory cell types are most vulnerable to infection by SARS-CoV-2, which causes Covid-19.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved drugmaker Eli Lilly and Co.’s radioactive compound to detect tau, an important characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease.

Toronto-based NoNO Inc. announced results from the pivotal Phase III ESCAPE-NA1 trial of intravenous nerinetide in patients with acute ischemic stroke who were chosen to undergo endovascular thrombectomy.

Researchers at the University of Helsinki identified a molecule called BT13 that potentially can increase levels of dopamine.

The best-known genetic marker for Alzheimer’s disease is ApoE4 – a form of apolipoprotein E – which is a protein involved in repairing neurons injured by aging, stroke or other reasons.

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found further evidence that microglia are the key link between the accumulation of abnormal proteins, including beta-amyloid and tau, in the brain and the actual brain damage observed in Alzheimer’s patients.

Researchers with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute conducted research using Pfizer’s anti-smoking drug Chantix to control neurons.

An experimental drug could offer hope for restoring damaged brain cells in Parkinson’s patients, scientists said on Wednesday, although they cautioned that a clinical trial was not able to prove the treatment slowed or halted the neurodegenerative disease.

Emulate won a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, to be used to send one of the Boston-based company’s Organ-Chips to the International Space Station in March 2019.